Religion, Homosexuality, and Contested Social Orders in the Netherlands, the Western Balkans, and Sweden (2014)

Mariecke van den Berg, David J. Bos, Marco Derks, R. Ruard Ganzevoort, Milos Jovanovic, Anne-Marie Korte, and Srdjan Sremac

Abstract
In a co-authored chapter in the edited volume Religion in Times of Crisis (eds. Gladys Ganiel, Christophe Monnot & Heidemarie Winkel; Religion and the Social Order, Volume 24; Leiden: Brill, 2014), we have sketched the theoretical framework of our research project and provided some preliminary analyses of public discourse about religion, homosexuality, and nationalism in the Netherlands, the Western Balkans, and Sweden.

We argue that the clashes between ‘imagined communities’ reflect changing public perceptions of sexualities, while simultaneously indicating shifting boundaries between ‘the secular’ and ‘the religious’ as well as between public and private spheres. Conservative religious groups have made the struggle against equal acceptance of homosexuality an important identity marker.

Conversely, LGBT rights movements have traditionally critiqued monotheistic religions for the latter’s ‘patriarchal’ and ‘homophobic’ attitudes, while positioning themselves as secular. This clash between sexual and religious belonging however intersects with struggles over cultural and national belonging.

You can read this chapter by clicking on this link: C.A.M. van den Berg et al. – Religion, Homosexuality, and Contested Social Orders in the Netherlands, the Western Balkans, and Sweden